Amazing, I use `Github Copilot` to write `Three.js` code

I’m from China. Today I just experienced ‘GitHub copilot’.
It’s amazing!
After I add Chinese comments, GitHub Copilot can actually give correct code automatically.
I thought GitHub Copilot only supported common JS code, but I didn’t expect to support ‘three. js’.

In the screenshot below, only the text in the yellow box was added by me.
The rest are automatically generated by Github Copilot.

Will we face unemployment?
emm…

If you are also interested, you can visit: copilot.github.com

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What kind of voodoo is this?!?

Don’t think we’ll be unemployed, but wow I’ve got to try this out as soon as I get home.

No matter if this statement intended to be serious or not I’m always a bit disappointed and annoyed when people (and especially developers) think AI software like Copilot will take jobs away. Almost all AI software is intended to support people in their work by doing very specific tasks more efficient and correct than a human could ever does.

It will take quite a while until AI and robotics are technically capable to fully replace a human workforce. And even at that point it’s a question of politics and regulation how and to what extend AI will affect the job market.

Besides, I’m sure there will be a similar effect like in the earlier days of humanity. Some jobs will disappear/acquired by advanced technology but new (and potentially better) ones will emerge in other areas.

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I have been using it for a day, and overall, it can guess 70% of what I want to do.
It’s impossible to say without a little frustration.
I suspect it has read and remembered all of GitHub’s projects, whether public or private.

It can indeed increase your efficiency while disturbing your thoughts.


Of course I will maintain a positive and optimistic attitude.

There is a Chinese English sentence: good good study and day day up.
This sentence means: study hard, improve every day.

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I’d be curious to hear from someone with longer experience pair programming whether Copilot feels similar, complementary, or something else? I’m still on the waitlist but it does sound impressive, and I think it’s fair to say that programming involves some mechanical and repetitive tasks that none of us would miss.

I don’t take it for granted that automation (in any industry) will benefit laborers equitably, but these are problems for economic policy to address IMHO, and I’m excited to see these advances in technology all the same. :slight_smile:

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It binds one to a special programming tool.

There Golem.de: IT-News für Profis I found

Quote ( german, translated with DeepL Translate: The world's most accurate translator )

“Github Copilot is currently available as a technical preview and should be particularly suitable for Python, Javascript, Typescript, Ruby and Go. The offering is initially implemented as an extension for Visual Studio Code. According to Github, there are no plans to extend this so far. The company also plans to commercialize the service in the future, but it is not yet known how.”

Microsoft is the Pilot, GitHub is the Copilot, and the Developer seems to be the Flight Attendant!

Microsoft is the Pilot, GitHub is the Copilot, and the Developer seems to be the Flight Attendant!

:grinning_face_with_smiling_eyes:

“Github Copilot is currently available as a technical preview and should be particularly suitable for Python, Javascript, Typescript, Ruby and Go. The offering is initially implemented as an extension for Visual Studio Code. According to Github, there are no plans to extend this so far. The company also plans to commercialize the service in the future, but it is not yet known how.”

It’s perfectly feasible, but we are light-years behind as there is no serious research on almost anything, let alone on something radical, time-consuming and risky, other than “preview” level implementations, and especially about software. In hardware development there is incomparably more passion (I know first hand).

The future is this: a visual tool that will need zero code, yet it’s flexibility and efficiency will be far better than code, while it will protect the developer from making mistakes (bugs).
Any other approach, eg a text-based one, is heading to the wrong direction and is wasting time, money and effort. Period.

For now, I would be very happy if the three.js contributors decided to develop a visual tool like the one in Unity engine.

I have been using Github Copilot for a week, and using Three.js to develop a point cloud box labeling tool. Let me talk about my real experience.

From the beginning of all kinds of suspicions about it to this moment I really enjoy the convenience it brings.
Github Copilot can indeed improve our efficiency of typing code.

In fact, there are two ways to use Github Copilot:

  1. Add comments and let Github Copilot help us reason out the code
  2. When writing code, according to the context Github Copilot, guess the code we might want to write and give code hints, just like TypeScript.

The question I raised at the beginning of this article does not actually exist at this time.

Will we face unemployment?

Because it is almost impossible for us to really describe the functional requirements of the program so clearly, and Github Copilot cannot fully understand our comments.
In the actual code writing process, I only use the second type (code hints) mentioned above.

Once again, after a little bit of adaptation to Github Copilot, the speed of typing code really improved.
And Github Copilot is AI and intelligent, it will automatically improve the code hint content according to some of our habits.

Github Copilot is definitely not just looking for similar code from github and returning it to us, but really thinking, improving, and improving.

We must start with doubts about any new things, but we will get used to it when we are familiar with it, and even cannot do without it.

@puxiao It’s great that you shared your experience with us.

I’d like to be optimistic about AI, but it’s unbelievably difficult for me to be so, maybe because of the long years of reading Science Fiction novels and the inculcation of the idea that AI artifacts would sooner or later turn against their masters and demolish whatever we’ve been proud for, ie. being the supreme intelligent creatures on this planet. The sad thing about AI is that it will turn against its competitors first, and in this particular case, the programmers themselves are the opponents to be dealt with in the long term, because the intelligence behind the idea is that, for becoming truly intelligent in the long run, you have to become efficiently superior to all other intelligent minds of other kinds and species. The alternative is an amicable symbiosis.

It may sound very radical at this time, but let’s just close our eyes for a moment and assume that the linguists, rather than the programmers, would be more capable of asking the right question from the AI, and their comments in this case, would be semantically more engaging and understandable than most of the comments brought about by the coders. It will be a paradigm shift even among the users, because when we are dealing with another intelligent being, whether organic or non-organic, there is the question of natural selection; both among the humans and in the field of organic and non-organic interaction. The only programmers that I can conceive of being on top of the food chain would be the ones who have designed and implemented such technology. And sadly the only thing they could do is to pull the plug, which they won’t do, as its against their financial schemes. After all, they are just greedy creatures, also known as humans.

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That’s a reason i never hosted any other projects than some open-source ones on GitHub. What does it mean finally? Like companies having private projects with several algorithms they developed, code GitHub claimed to be secure and protected and someone else only needs to ask the copilot to implement it? :sweat_smile: I’m not sure if they included private repositories, but since only GitHub can tell it’s save to assume.

I think this also has negative side effects. It’s more meant to be an aid but i’m quite sure this will create a lot Frankenstein projects, especially students or people that don’t know programming but try to do their work/homework with this tool then, a exaggerated version of the stackoverflow copypasta. People become quite lazy from code-completion already, i experienced those having to program in a plain editor to act like their limbs fell off. But this “just telling what to code” feels like a bizarre exaggeration of visual node programming that some probably interpret as “only tell” not having to know coding anymore.

Until ASI this won’t become a serious threat to jobs, there is much more to projects than just standalone code parts especially everything that goes into a project as a whole. I can’t share the idealistic thought of it only creating more comfortable jobs, in fact the loss of jobs that came from digital age and more companies automating everything already cost far more than it created unfortunately, also created dominating monopoles like Google, Amazon, Microsoft, Facebook that bash out even people in the same business living from it (thousands or hundred thousands) with small apps just by their position and reach, this will be exponentially higher with AI, just imagine all the workers sorting out stuff on a line a AI can do hundred times faster and cheaper (already happened). And with ASI we’re already talking about a new world order it’s not even possible to estimate if it will be positive or negative, for the rich monopoles having it, it sure will be positive :sweat_smile:

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I have to partially disagree with the last two comments, programming is NOT a religion, it’s role is to serve people’s purposes, not the other way around.

Like smoke signals, telegraph and steam-engines , coding is temporary, because it’s an imperfect, very low-efficiency (read: primitive) method or tool to implement algorithms, as it’s incompatible to how the human brain works and perceives reality: it only exploits human’s reading and writing ability(!) like assuming that we are a human-typewritter species, ignoring most of our sensory system and thus, most part of our brain - it’s almost ridiculous given today’s technology potential!

As an analogy, it’s like programming in machine code directly with ones and zeroes (been there, done that for a large piece of code for MCUs), you can do it, but it’s far less efficient and much more error prone than Assembly language, or a decent higher level one like C++.
Or it’s like preferring a DOS interface for your PC, vs a windows interface.
PC DOS interface died, and won’t come back for a reason.

Fyrestar:
It’s more meant to be an aid but i’m quite sure this will create a lot Frankenstein projects

Agreed, but no one likes Frankestein anyway.

People become quite lazy from code-completion already, i experienced those having to program in a plain editor to act like their limbs fell off.

That’s because coding is incompatible to our nature, for the reasons I explained above.

I can’t share the idealistic thought of it only creating more comfortable jobs

It’s a fact, there is a continuous shift to less heavy, uncomfortable and unhealthy jobs. You don’t have to dig for a living for example.

also created dominating monopoles like Google, Amazon, Microsoft, Facebook that bash out even people in the same business living from it

Tools can’t do that by themselves, this is the product of our (still) primitive culture (which allows insane concentration of power), but it’s inevitable to evolve too.

Abraham:
AI artifacts would sooner or later turn against their masters and demolish whatever we’ve been proud for, ie. being the supreme intelligent creatures on this planet.

AI won’t ever “take over” -that only belongs to bad science fiction, simply because:

  1. We’ll evolve along, as we have plenty of time until A.I evolves to a species comparable to human,
  2. By then, we’ll have become wiser, and won’t provide A.I species with enough power required to “take over”.

I just have to mention that biological evolution is a long process. Significant changes in complex organisms can take millions of years. Technological evolution moves at lightspeed in comparison. But I do agree that we will not be hunted down by autonomous Terminators or be stuck inside a Matrix like simulation via AI any time soon. Humans will probably do that to each other first.

Please stop the debate, I think your discussion has gone beyond the scope.

I hate political correctness.

I also don’t want to have deep soul-like communication with you.

Learning and using Three.js can make me happy every day, that’s enough.

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Yes, he’s right. Let’s enjoy coding, while we can. That will be the ultimate purpose from now on.

AI? I’m still waiting for video to kill the radio star

Please stop the debate, I think your discussion has gone beyond the scope.

I hate political correctness.

I also don’t want to have deep soul-like communication with you.

Learning and using Three.js can make me happy every day, that’s enough.

Well, to succeed in programming, you also need to have a higher level of philosophical maturity, as the art of programming is not just typing a sequence of correct instructions for a given purpose, it’s how you approach and solve each human problem while taking into account several human and social factors, that will affect the experience, and ultimately the lives of end-users and society too, as society today is highly depended on software.

That’s why just hiring supposedly “geniuses”, yet immature kids by the industry, leads to “solutions” and implementations that most of them fail in the market after the initial huge financial boost, because they ignored completely some essential human and/or social factors, and they end up abandoned, one after the other.

In that context, going “beyond the scope”, of merely typing and testing (that anyone can do), is a must…

But of course I’ll respect your wish, so let’s focus on the core of this topic:

I’m sure all of us appreciate for inrofming us about this new tool.
Here’s my feedback:

  1. If you had provided that screenshot in English, we would be able to judge the output vs the input, now we can’t do that, as obviously none of us knows Chinese (except Chinese developers) as the website doesn’t provide any amount of convincing examples.

  2. While it is hosted on Github, it is proprietary code, and requires a “signup” to become one of the few testers that will have access to their “technical-preview” - one more reason that more info from your side would be useful.

  3. That obviously means that the end result will be a service, therefore, they will also have access to my code and my ideas, which personally I cannot accept, as I value ideas and competitive future plans for my business far more than the sequence of instructions.
    Of course, that is only my personal view, someone else’s view might differ, especially one that makes everything public from the beginning, but even that is a contradiction with a paid service…

  4. Speaking of instructions, I always try to optimize the code, discover new solutions, and aim to achieve higher performance than average. Obviously this tool at this early stage is incapable to be inspired and invent new methods - BTW “inspiration” and “invention” are unknown words for today’s A.I -there is no science behind them. If this tool was at least good enough at what it promises, I could use it, then optimize the code, provided it was a standalone downloaded tool, not an online service.

  5. Another ̶p̶o̶s̶s̶i̶b̶l̶e̶ definite problem is that it will contribute in making bugs along with the developer, by misunderstanding what the developer wants to do, and what is required for everything to glue up and work together at higher levels of functionality, let alone the issues arising from its inadequate knowledge - like not knowing how to import trackballcontrols you mentioned.
    Chances are that there will be other, more subtle issues too, not easily discovered and corrected by the developer. If the developer has to correct the tool, then that defeats the purpose…

Along with “Advanced Intelligence”, comes “Advanced Human Weaknesses” too, that’s inevitable.

That said, I would congratulate anyone daring to develop radical solutions, and boost technology further, instead of merely creating variations of the same theme like most do, for the effort alone.

Given all the issues above, when that tool matures and succeeds, I’ll give it a try, as I don’t have time to become a beta-tester.

I totally agree with you, otherwise any variation of an AI bot could possibly contribute to the presumably organic life form discussion forums, more effectively. Anyway, I believe, and this is only my personal belief that might be changed through time, that any form of vast usage of AI could inevitably lead to human suffering and job losses. I myself am a developer, but I do not directly earn money from it, I just code for my own business. It only contributes to some 15 percent of my total income, so in the long run I will not be affected by the dominance of AI that much. However, I can foresee a world dominated by AI right now, and as @Fyrestar mentioned earlier, the rich monopolies have it right now. Let me be clear, it is the rich monopolies who wield this trident of Poseidon and could use it anytime for and against whoever they may feel competitive enough in the market.

It sounds extreme, but let’s face it. we are living in a world which the death of millions is just statistics figures, let alone job losses. So let’s not think like a bunch of robots and stop handing out free code to the arsenal of the dominating monopolies, they’re using that complimentary code against the very providers.

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